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Puzzles

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  • This topic has 80 replies, 26 voices, and was last updated 6 months ago by kford_academy.
Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 81 total)
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  • #91022
    HarshilK
    Participant

    Question 1 (to any god):
    Ask, “If I were to ask you if you are True, would you answer ‘da’?”

    If you ask this question to A (True), they would respond ‘da’ because they always speak the truth.
    If you ask this question to B (False), they would also respond ‘da’ because they would lie about lying (saying ‘ja’ to your question about being True).
    If you ask this question to C (Random), they would respond randomly with either ‘da’ or ‘ja’.
    Question 2 (to a different god):
    Ask, “If I were to ask you if the first god (the one you asked question 1) is True, would you answer ‘da’?”

    If you ask this question to A (True), they would respond ‘da’ because they would confirm that the first god (who is also True) is indeed True.
    If you ask this question to B (False), they would respond ‘ja’ because they would lie about the first god being True (who is actually True).
    If you ask this question to C (Random), they would respond randomly with either ‘da’ or ‘ja’.
    Question 3 (to the remaining god):
    Ask, “Is the second god (the one you asked question 2) True?”

    If you ask this question to A (True), they would respond ‘da’ because they always speak the truth, confirming that the second god is True.
    If you ask this question to B (False), they would respond ‘ja’ because they would lie about the second god being True (who is actually True).
    If you ask this question to C (Random), they would respond randomly with either ‘da’ or ‘ja’.

    #91101
    HolmesBigBrain
    Participant

    I think the answer is four.

    #91102
    HolmesBigBrain
    Participant

    I think the answer would be eleven times?

    #91162
    doggirl
    Participant

    I think the first question I would ask to A would be “If I ask b if you are true what would they say?” If they give me an answer that means b is not random if they don’t give me an answer i know be is random.

    If I know b is not random I would ask C this question , “If I ask a If you are true what would they say?” If they dont give you an answer a is random
    If they give you an answer C is random

    The last question,(if figured out that random is either a or c is random you can ask this question to C)
    “If I ask the truth among you and da is yes what would they say?”

    If they say da c is true
    If they say ja c is false

    (Ask they same if figured out that B is random in first question)

    #91182
    doggirl
    Participant

    I think the first question I would ask to A would be “If I ask b if you are true what would they say?” If they give me an answer that means b is not random if they don’t give me an answer i know be is random.

    If I know b is not random I would ask C this question , “If I ask a If you are true what would they say?” If they dont give you an answer a is random
    If they give you an answer C is random

    The last question,(if figured out that random is either a or c is random you can ask this question to C)
    “If I ask the truth among you if da is yes what would they say?”

    If they say da c is true
    If they say ja c is false

    (Ask they same if figured out that B is random in first question)

    #90936
    The_Letter_Wriggler
    Participant

    @Luke-Chesters The Elite Club
    This nice little puzzle has been given in many different forms.
    The answer is in the writing itself!

    Answer is …]

    Harry, maybe you will delete the info in the brackets [] to hide from others.

    #91067
    ANANDD
    Participant

    I have heard of this before, isn’t it […]

    #91309
    geek_girl
    Participant

    Here’s a new puzzle! Can you figure out what this coded message is?
    key: aeiou-12345

    [Sorry to edit this, but we have a rule that if you want to post a cipher text as a challenge then you need to include the solution and a short outline of how it works. You should add that beneath the challenge text under a line that says

    %%%%%%%%%%%%% HARRY, DELETE FROM HERE %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

    so we can see what to remove before posting. (Warning – The Elves have got this wrong once or twice!]

    If you would like to post this again with the added detail, we would love to look at it. Thanks, Harry]

    #91683
    kford_academy
    Participant

    Some trick puzzles for the easily entertained… Enjoy!

    1) I need to deliver four letters to four houses, one letter per house. Unfortunately, I muddle the letters up, and so the letters are delivered to the houses in a random order. What is the probability that I deliver exactly three letters to their correct houses?

    2) Take any tetrahedron (regular or not). Choose two of its vertices, and also locate its centre of mass (assume it is uniform). Show that these three points lie on a unique plane.

    3) Find as many ways as you can of measuring the height of a (tall) building with a thermometer.

    4) A set of ‘triplet primes’ is a set of primes of the form p,p+2,p+4. Obviously 3,5,7 is an example; find all other examples.

    5) A bear starts in the Arctic Circle. It walks 1km West, 1km North, 1km East, 1km South. Can it ever return to its starting point?

    6) In a very dark room, you have two red pills and two blue pills. In order to survive, you must consume one red and one blue pill, thus enabling you with night vision to find the correct exit door (and not the booby-trapped one). No other combination suffices. Unfortunately, you lost track of the colours of the pills. What do you do?

    #91744
    Luke-Chesters
    Participant

    @kford_academy

    To five, I say four.

    To fourteen, I say eight.

    @f6exb_the_frenchy

    Yes! I might have a harder one, but I need to try and remember it…

    #91746
    Luke-Chesters
    Participant

    @kford_academy

    I’ve figured out 1 and 6, but I’m not sure about the others.

    5 I may have the answer to, but I’m not sure about the wording. Does the bear start from anywhere in the Arctic Circle, or on the actual North Pole?

    #91747
    Luke-Chesters
    Participant

    I just thought of this one, maybe it isn’t the most glamorous but it works.

    In a magic show, a magician tells the audience about a special mirror they have, a mirror that isn’t a mirror, that doesn’t reflect anything. Crazy, right?
    The audience thought so too, and demanded to be shown this strange mirror.

    The magician takes the mirror out, a simple, unadorned, gleaming mirror, it looks just like any old mirror.
    The audience is incredibly doubtful, as the mirror very clearly reflects everything. The mirror is clean, and they even show the back of it, which, is also normal.

    No tricks, the magician insists. They step away, showing nothing in either hand, sleeve or in any other compartment on them. Then the magician does something, which indeed makes the mirror reflect nothing.

    What did they do?

    #91757
    kford_academy
    Participant

    @Luke-Chesters
    Anywhere in the Arctic Circle. The question asks whether or not the bear could travel 1km West, etc., and end up where it started. Have fun!

    #91785
    Yello
    Participant

    1.3/16
    2. Don’t know
    3. If it is a mercury thermometer we can measure the expansion of the mercury due to heat
    4.The only things I could come up with were 13,15,17 and 19,21,23
    5. It can return to its starting point because it is in the Arctic circle which is in the North Pole
    6. Eat all of the pills

    #91787
    f6exb_the_frenchy
    Participant

    #91683 5)
    The meridians are not parallel.
    1 km from west to east, further north, crosses more meridians. So start and end points are not the same.

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